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April 10, 2017updated 12 Oct 2022 1:45pm

What was Google’s IPO stock price?

The tech Goliath went public in 2004 - but did you know they offered to sell the company for as little as $750,000 in 1999?

By Ellie Burns

Google, the search engine and technology giant, is listed on the NASDAQ stock exchange under the ticker symbols GOOGL and GOOG.

The road to Google’s IPO was an interesting one: in 1999, Sergey Brin and Larry Page wanted to sell the company to Excite. They approached Excite CEO George Bell and offered to sell Google to him for $1 million. Bell rejected the offer. Excite could have had Google for even cheaper, after one of Excite’s venture capitalists talked Bin and Page down to $750,000. Bell still rejected the offer.

Five years later in 2004, the company went public. At the time, Page, Brin and Eric Schmidt agreed to work together at Google for another 20 years, until 2024.

What was Google originally valued at?

At the initial public listing, Google offered 19,605,052 shares at $85 per share. Google sold $1.67 billion in stock and achieved a market cap of more than $23bn. By 2014, this market cap had grown to an astonishing $397bn. The majority of shares in Google were retained by the company and its employees, with many who worked at Google becoming instant paper millionaires went the company went public.

Interestingly – a major rival of Google, Yahoo, also benefited from the IPO, as it owned 8.4 million Google shares before the IPO.

Google stock price performed well after the IPO, with shares hitting $350 for the first time on October 31 2007.

What is Google’s stock price now?

Now (as of October 2022), the price of Google shares is fourteen times that of 2009, valued at around $1,800. The company has cemented its place as the undisputed search engine of choice and has expanded its business into cloud computing, AI, software as a service and even mobile phones.

Read more: What is the future of generative AI?

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