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Technology / Networks

WLAN market grows by 23.9% year over year in Q32011: IDC

Results from the Q32011 showed strong growth with worldwide revenues growing 23.9% year over year to nearly $1.7bn
IDC announced third quarter results and recent enhancements to its Worldwide Quarterly WLAN Tracker, which covers the enterprise and consumer wireless local area network (WLAN) market.

Results from the Q32011 showed strong growth with worldwide revenues growing 23.9% year over year to nearly $1.7bn (excluding WLAN NICs). In the enterprise WLAN market, revenues grew 32.6% year over year to $812.9m, which now accounts for 49% of the total WLAN market.

IDC director Enterprise Communications Infrastructure Rohit Mehra said enterprise mobility and BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) have become one of the most visible and key priorities for CIOs and IT managers, and the continued growth of the enterprise WLAN market in 2011 is a clear testament to that market dynamic. "The tremendous momentum behind smart-phones and tablets and their continued uptake in the enterprise in conjunction with mobile and cloud-based apps are motivating IT to reassess their network infrastructure needs, and that bodes well for network equipment vendors," Mehra said.

From a regional perspective, the overall WLAN market grew fastest in the Asia/Pacific (excluding Japan) (APeJ) region with a 36.1% year-over-year increase. However, the 21.8% growth in EMEA and the 19.9% increase in the Americas also reflected market strength in these regions.

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China is now the second largest country by revenue in the WLAN market, with 3Q11 revenues of $147.4m, behind the United States $627.9m and ahead of Germany $127.1m and Japan $87.6m.

Worldwide Network Tracker Research senior research analyst Petr Jirovský said China was benefiting from strong growth in both the enterprise and consumer segments.


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