View all newsletters
Receive our newsletter - data, insights and analysis delivered to you
  1. Technology
December 5, 2008updated 19 Aug 2016 10:07am

The mainframe isn’t dead, it’s resting

This isn't breaking news: reports of the mainframe’s demise are not only premature, they are utterly wrong. But what is true is that companies are trying to do more with less in this economic environment, and that includes the trusty

By

This isn’t breaking news: reports of the mainframe’s demise are not only premature, they are utterly wrong.

But what is true is that companies are trying to do more with less in this economic environment, and that includes the trusty mainframe.

Macro 4 has just completed a survey of 97 mainframe users in which 84% said they wanted to free up mainframe processing power.

This would let them delay purchases of costly CPU upgrades and immediately reduce monthly systems software license charges which vary in line with how much CPU power was used in the previous month.

In a bid to control costs, Tesco has made use of performance management software from Macro 4 to help generate a significant reduction in MIPS usage before Christmas, when mainframe activity approaches peak levels.

The retailer commissioned Macro 4 partner, CPT Global, an independent performance management specialist, to consult on the project. Phase one involved CPT Global using Macro 4’s software to identify opportunities where changes to databases, systems software and applications could generate MIPS savings. In the next stage CPT is providing a more detailed assessment of these opportunities so its developers can go in and make the necessary changes.

Gartner has estimated that most large mainframe users can expect their systems’ consumption of processing power to increase by 15-20% annually, measured in MIPS.

Content from our partners
How to combat the rise in cyberattacks
Why email is still the number one threat vector
Why HR must take firm steps to become a more data-driven function

Each additional MIPS typically costs around £2,500 in hardware and software charges. So if a company running a 10,000 MIPS system increases capacity by just 10% per annum, the incremental cost will be in the region of £2.5 million.

Still, that didn’t stop IBM’s z Series mainframe revenue being even more robust than its other server lines in its latest quarter – people may be trying to do more with less, but they’re not abandoning the mainframe just yet either.

Websites in our network
NEWSLETTER Sign up Tick the boxes of the newsletters you would like to receive. Tech Monitor's research, insight and analysis examines the frontiers of digital transformation to help tech leaders navigate the future. Our Changelog newsletter delivers our best work to your inbox every week.
I consent to New Statesman Media Group collecting my details provided via this form in accordance with the Privacy Policy
SUBSCRIBED

THANK YOU