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July 30, 1997updated 05 Sep 2016 1:01pm

SUN OFFERS INTERNET-BASED DIRECTORY SERVICE

By CBR Staff Writer

Sun Microsystems Inc has created its first internet-based directory service for identifying users and resources on intranet networks, saying Sun Directory Services 1.0 (SDS) will be used as the basis for the majority of its future products in the web- and internet-based directory space. Supporting the Lightweight Directory Access Protocol, SDS ships in September and will support replication, single sign-on, and a web gateway enabling users to query and edit data from web browsers. The basis of a fully-integrated web-based internet directory services product line, it will in future be incorporated into all of Sun’s other mail, messaging, security and network management products. Unlike Sun’s existing NIS and NIS+ naming and directory services, said to provide a higher degree of security and reliability in LAN environments, SDS will initially be offered as a standalone product. Sun also offers a standalone X.500 directory product. SDS will include support for the company’s Java Management APIs, which are being developed for use by ISVs creating applications to manage Sun-based networks, including the likes of CA-Unicenter TNG, and maybe Tivoli TME too. SDS includes as SNMP agent too, meaning any JMAPI or SNMP product will be able to manage SDS. SDS will support NDS NetWare Directory Services which Sun has licensed from Novell Inc when NDS is LDAP-compliant. Its concern is that unlike SDS, NDS requires a large chunk of client code to operate. Microsoft Corp’s Windows NT-based Active Directory service has neither a web gateway nor an SNMP agent, Sun crows. As Sun’s JMAPI specifications – being created by JavaSoft – are still in draft form, it’s not clear when ISVs – including Computer Associates and others – or end-users will be able to take advantage of this functionality. Wags have even created an acronym called JVAPI. It means either JMAPI Vapor APIs or Java Virtual APIs. Sun says SDS will cost $1,000 and supports standard internet messaging products as well as Microsoft Exchange mail clients, Netscape and Microsoft browsers and Windows 95 and NT clients.

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