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February 17, 2015updated 19 Aug 2016 3:59pm

Kaspersky pair with bio-hackers amid implant fears

Crooks may target connected body mods through radio frequencies.

By Jimmy Nicholls

The security vendor Kaspersky Lab has announced a partnership with bio-hackers BioNyfiken amid fears that increased use of connected implants could have serious security risks.

Internet of Things (IoT) manufacturers are hoping to use better information to enhance functionality and improve later product releases, but concerns remain over who will be responsible for securing the companies’ products.

Eugene Kaspersky, chief executive of Kaspersky, said: "Personally, I’d rather not be chipped. I do however understand that technological progress cannot be hindered and there will be innovators who are ready to accept the risk and test the limits of technology by experimenting on their own bodies."

"I’d just rather they did this with their eyes open and with security at the forefront of their minds, instead of as a retrofit after-thought, as so often occurs."

BioNyfiken is leading the charge on near field communication (NFC) chip implants that can be used to make payments, replace door keys or access computers.

Alongside Kaspersky the firm will now work to investigate the potential security risks of the technology, which some worry may be vulnerable to remote interception through radio signals.

Hannes Sjoblad, one of the founders of BioNyfiken, said: "I consider the take-off of this technology as another important interface-moment in the history of human-computer interaction, similar to the launches of the first windows desktop or the first touch screen."

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"Identification by touch is innately natural for humans. PIN codes and passwords are not natural. And every additional device that we have to carry around to identify ourselves be it a key fob or a swipe card, is just another item that clutters our lives."

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