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August 2, 1988

CARNEGIE MELLON HAS LAY LANGUAGE FOR WRITING GRAPHICAL USER INTERFACES

By CBR Staff Writer

Developers at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh have come up with a computer language that is claimed will enable non professionals to write graphical interfaces to applications software, including windows, pull-down menus, and multifont text. Called cT, or Carnegie Mellon University Tutor, the new language is described as a general purpose facility for any situation where a modern user interface is required, and is designed for font and graphics rescaling, with the same source code able to run on a Mac, a Sun Microsystems workstation, an IBM RT or a DEC MicroVAX. One of the language’s developers, Bruce Sherwood, said the language’s goals and methods were reminiscent of a very good Basic, when quoted by the Microbytes newswire. At Carnegie Mellon, cT has been in use for a year, is now becoming commercially available for the Mac, with IBM PS/2 and Unix versions (running under X-Window) promised for later this year.

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