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Technology / AI and automation

Best Keyboard for Android

This list will guide you through the wide array of applications to help you find the best keyboard for Android devices, it could even bestow godlike typing capabilities upon you. You may be so amazed by your new powers that you actually start jotting down ideas for how your costume will look when you embark on your new life as a super hero.

Before you get completely lost in a day dream of capes fluttering gloriously upon the breeze, let’s focus on the important factors. Features including security, language capabilities and compatibilities, emojis and predictive text are some that will be noted. This list will take cost in to account, but fortunately these top options tend to be free!

SwiftKey

First and foremost, the added sweetener with this option is that it used to be a paid app, but now it is now a free keyboard for Android. Users do still however have to pay if they wish to extend the range of themes available. There are more than 80 various themes available to customise your experience.

SwiftKey uses what it calls the “fluency engine” to bring formidable typing capabilities to the user. Often having been regarded as superior to the built-in Google keyboard, it has for some time actually come pre-installed on a variety of devices.

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SwiftKey is built with algorithm technology that is able to learn about your personal typing habits, meaning that aut-correct is at its most personal in this option. For example, you are more of a heavy handed typist; SwiftKey will still work out what you are aiming to write, helping you match the more nimble typist in efficiency.

The next-word prediction that is built into SwiftKey is also highly formidable, producing excellently precise suggestions; these features are also capable of managing two languages at the same time.

 

Fleksy

This free keyboard for Android has the impressive claim to fame of having been the one used to set the world record for texting speed, twice. This detail is going to appeal to even the most practical person, smiling gleefully at the thought of handling work, rest and play at world record speed.

The keyboard works as you would expect a keyboard to work, by tapping each letter and character, rather than the swiping that has been taken up by some providers. Gestures can be used as a handy way of clearing text or selecting auto-correct suggestions.

Android

Customisation is a significant plus point with this option, as you are able to enlarge or reduce the size of the keyboard, including controls to manipulate layout and colours. These features contribute to finding the set-up that allows you to achieve maximum potential from a keyboard for Android.

Security is also taken into account with Fleksy, as the application is under-pinned by a robust privacy policy, so you will be fully aware of the information that the keyboard is able to access.

 

Swype

This option also offers a free version; however the full one will only cost $1.00. As opposed to Fleksy, this keyboard offers a new approach to typing that may suit some users more than the traditional typing format. With Swype the idea is that you draw out sentences.

Some may think this is the future of typing on a device, as the predictive abilities of the technology are highly intuitive. If you have never tried this kind of typing, the user draws a line with their finger over the letters on the keyboard that they wish to include. The application is then able to discern which letters are the ones intended for use, and of the greatest importance.

Android

If multiple languages are an important factor governing your choice, Swype also covers this ground. Bilingual support is available, along with gestures and audio-response typing.

Another strong feature of the Swype keyboard for Android is the ability to adjust the size of the letters; this could be particularly useful when getting used to drawing out sentences. This factor is solid, as I have heard a great deal of complaint about other options being too fiddly to use. Once a preference has been found, the settings can be saved across multiple devices.

 

Minuum

This solid option that has made it into our top five does come with one

Android

drawback, unlike the predominantly free options available, this one comes with a bank b

alance shattering price tag of $4.00. All jokes aside, there is a good argument for this one being the most expensive on the list.

Minuum is a good option if you want to keep as much of your screen space free as possible and it can be more desirable if you are using a smaller device. You may be thinking smaller will mean fiddly and annoying, but in fact the auto-correct is excellent, and will cover your mistakes.

To put the effectiveness of this keyboard for Android in small spaces into perspective, the interface has been reviewed as being usable and effective with smartwatches and Google Glass.

The privacy policy that comes with Minuum is also a very impressive element to keep in mind when choosing. Unlike many other options, with this one you can choose how to handle your usage data, contributing it anonymously, or keeping it to yourself entirely.

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Microsoft Hub

This angle on a keyboard presented by Microsoft is distinctive as it is not geared towards revolutionising the actual act of typing on a device keyboard.

The Microsoft Hub provides benefits to the user by making your other applications immediately accessible from the interface.

This could mean the easy access to Microsoft Word and Excel files that you would otherwise have to attach in a more roundabout way. This works using a clipboard, and it is very well suited to the combined use of Office 365.

The interface is also very sleek and distinctive, and given the capabilities we have just detailed, this could be an extremely useful option for business purposes when files are sent on a regular basis, and must be readily available. The other selling point with this option is the fact that it too is free!
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