View all newsletters
Receive our newsletter - data, insights and analysis delivered to you
  1. Technology
April 10, 2014

Is the Apple iWatch price and September release date set in stone?

The latest rumours come from KGI’s technology analyst, Ming-Chi Kuo.

By

Apple’s iWatch is likely to be released at the end of the third quarter and cost more than $1,000, according to a leading securities analyst.

KGI’s Ming-Chi Kuo, who has a reputation for accurately predicting device vendors’ plans, told MacRumours and Apple Insider his expectations for the rumoured smartwatch.

Kuo believes the iPhone maker is working on two different sizes: One with a 1.3-inch screen and a 1.5-inch version, which both integrate with the iPhone, iPad and Mac.

Both models would have a flexible AMOLED display with sapphire cover lens, which seems to be in line with other rumours.

Kuo said: "Fashion is the name of the game; most expensive model likely priced at several thousand US dollars. Referring to the rules of the fashion market, we predict the iWatch casing and band will come in various materials.

"The most expensive model of the iWatch line will carry a price tag of several thousand US dollars."

Content from our partners
European Technology Leadership: Deutsche Bank CTO Gordon Mackechnie
Print’s role in driving the environmental agenda
What finance leaders get wrong about digital transformation

Other features would include biometric technology, an NFC chip, and a 200 to 250 mAH battery, which is longer than average for many smartwatches.

The predictions come after the New York Times claimed in February that Apple is experimenting with "wrist-like devices made of curved glass".

Other reports this week from the Korea Herald suggest that LG is close to furthering its partnership with Apple, and may soon set a deal to provide screens.

"LG Display has been in talks over flexible organic light-emitting diode panels for quite a while and it looks like it will be sealing the deal with Apple," the source said.

Apple is also working on ‘power-charging methods’ from solar power magnetic induction, but such possibilities are years from becoming a reality, according to the New York Times.

Websites in our network
NEWSLETTER Sign up Tick the boxes of the newsletters you would like to receive. Tech Monitor's research, insight and analysis examines the frontiers of digital transformation to help tech leaders navigate the future. Our Changelog newsletter delivers our best work to your inbox every week.
I consent to New Statesman Media Group collecting my details provided via this form in accordance with the Privacy Policy
SUBSCRIBED

THANK YOU